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2 Corinthians 13:5 – Examine Ourselves, or Not? | Pt 2

Instead of examining our own works, we should be focusing on Jesus only. Picture of a boy laughing with an open Bible on his lap. Photo by Ben White on Unsplash.
Instead of examining our own works, we should be focusing on Jesus only. It is then that we can have the joy of the full assurance of our salvation.

Peter Ditzel

In part 1, we saw that many interpret 2 Corinthians 13:5 to mean that we should examine our works for evidences of conversion. We also saw that the context shows that Paul’s focus was himself. He expected the Corinthians to see that the fact that they were believers proved that God had worked through him to bring about their conversion. They were to stop listening to people who were maligning him. Now, let’s look at another proof that this verse isn’t teaching us to examine ourselves for evidence of conversion.

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2 Corinthians 13:5 – Examine Ourselves, or Not?

A woman looking comtemplative and downcast. Did Paul in 2 Corinthians 13:5 tell us to examine ourselves for evidences of conversion? Photo by Irene Strong on Unsplash
Did Paul tell us to examine ourselves for evidences of conversion?
Photo by Irene Strong on Unsplash

Part 1

Peter Ditzel

Are we Christians supposed to examine ourselves for evidences of conversion? Some very prominent pastors, preachers, and writers would answer yes. They say that we’re to take stock of whether we’re producing works of conversion. These works show that we are really saved. They base this on 2 Corinthians 13:5, in which Paul tells his readers to examine themselves and test themselves. But how does such a teaching square with the biblical assertion that our salvation is entirely by grace through faith? If we are saved by grace through faith in Jesus Christ, why should we look to our works as evidences of conversion? Are we to examine ourselves or not?

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Q. How can I know that I am saved?

A. This is a common question. Some other ways that it can be asked are, “How can I know that God has chosen me as one of His children?” and, “How can I be assured of God’s love for me?” It is, in fact, a question of what theologians call assurance.

I know people who have come up with all sorts of elaborate ways to answer this question. They tell people to look at themselves and see how they have changed since the time they think they became a Christian. They tell them to look at their love for others, their Christian works, their growth in Scriptural knowledge, their better morality, how much they love the law, and so on. Others will also advise people to wait for a vision, a voice, or a feeling to know they are saved.

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